Category: Handy Andy

North Houston’s Remarkable Handy Randalls in Champions

When this store opened, it had a gable front facade. Safeway gave the front of this store a more traditional look in the early 2000s.

Editor’s Note: Today’s post is a guest submission from HHR’s good friend Anonymous in Houston with the photos being taken by Mike For close to 50 years, the supermarket featured in this blog post has been one of, if not the, most upscale supermarkets in all of the northern half of Houston. With that in mind, it’s fair to say that this supermarket is truly remarkable! This remarkable store, the Randall’s Flagship store at 5219 FM 1960 W and Champion Forest Dr., started life out as a Handy Andy Supermarket when it opened on April 8, 1974 in the Champions …

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Fishing Tackle Unlimited closing means the end for this historic former Sugar Land Grocery Store

This entry facade was a recent add under Fiesta, Gerland's had a simply flush door capped with a small concrete arch

Fishing Tackle Unlimited, the Fishing Superstore, located just outside the entrance to the Sugar Creek Neighborhood has recently closed. While I’m not sure exactly when the store shut down it seems to have been sometime in early April of this year. Fishing Tackle Unlimited is hardly the first tenant here, but it has done a great job of preserving the history of an important building in the area. For many years, this was one of the only grocery stores in this part of Fort Bend County. Located at 13831 Southwest Fwy, Sugar Land, TX 77478 plans for a grocery store …

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Handy Randalls, the store that killed an HEB still here 50 years later

Howdy, folks, and welcome back to Houston Historic Retail! Today we’re taking an in-depth look at one of Houston’s former Handy Andy stores. If you’re not in the know about Handy Andy, let me give you a little background. They were a grocer based out of San Antonio who expanded to Houston in the 1970s. During the initial phases of their expansion, things went quite well with the Becker family, who owned the stores, building four large-format stores unlike anything else they’d ever built. These new stores were much larger than an average grocery store of the time, had a …

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