Tag: demolition

This Week in Demolition: Avalon Place’s finest Gregorian

This week in demolition, not a whole lot is going on! While we have a pretty standard length demolition list, none of the buildings are particularly interesting. Which unfortunately means that I don’t really have a story to tell this week so let’s just get straight into the interesting buildings. First we have this week’s featured home 2515 Reba Drive. This wonderful 1940s Gregorian style two story, has been tastefully updated while keeping much of its original exterior charm. Huge picture windows surround the original fireplace. The only new construction on the house is a one room two story addition …

Continue reading
The green continues into the master bathroom, which contains a separate powder room. Check out the gas heater in the wall, remember how bad those things leaked?!

This Week in Demolition: The Sixth Christian Scientist Church, and Grandma’s House

Welcome back loyal reader, to another edition of This Week in Demolition! This week, we have quite a few points of interest to observe. Let us begin with the Sixth Church of Christ Scientist which is located at 2202 Elgin, on a corner lot directly across from Emancipation Park. The church was constructed in 1941 by the first recognized congregation of African American Christian Scientists in Texas. The house of worship was in operation until 2005 when only a few members of the congregation remained. In 2017 Harris County dedicated a memorial plaque recognizing the building’s history. While many have …

Continue reading

This Week in Demolition: Disappearing Properties

This week in Demolition, we don’t have much of a story. Part of this is due to a lack of interesting homes this week, another issue is a phenomenon of real estate websites deleting older listing and removing older photos. Take for example 4639 Ingersoll, a relatively standard 1950s Home located in Afton Oaks. HAR.com lists only one photo, while Realtor.com shows 22. Obviously the photos are from an older listing based purely on size, quality, and the general look of the house. Often now houses are sold on a “for lot value” basis only with some owners refusing to …

Continue reading
The Garage Apartment is to the right of the house

This Week in Demolition: 3015 ½ Inwood, the French Quarter garage apartment in River Oaks

This Week in Demolition we have a much shorter list than we’ve seen in the past few weeks, with only a couple of non-residential demolitions. Starting off this week we have a garage apartment from a house that you’re almost sure to recognize if you’ve ever driven through River Oaks. Located in the rear of the neighborhood 3015 Inwood is one of the original homes in the area. Construction was started in 1935 under the direction of notable regional architect John F. Staub. The house is colloquially known as the “New Orleans” house. A designation it seems to have gained …

Continue reading

This Week in Demolition: Is the Eiffel Tower included?

Happy Easter loyal reader! I hope you’re enjoying what is likely a day off for you, I hope you have time to spend with your family and those around you. As such we’ll keep today’s post short. We have no real commercial demolitions this week, the closest being a former home turned church but nothing of interest. Moving onto homes it seems the time of the “Modern Ranch” is coming to a close. By this I mean homes that were originally built in a traditional ranch style around the 60s or so. They were then highly remodeled during the 90s …

Continue reading
Etta's as it appeared in 2019 Image source from Streetview

This Week in Demolition: Etta’s Lounge meets its end, and an address on the NRHP

Welcome back loyal reader, This Week in Demolition we see the loss of one of a popular former club with a long history, along with a few interesting residential addresses. Let’s start of with Etta’s Lounge, the building has a unique history as one of Houston’s first 7-Eleven locations. Opening around the end of 1952 or early 53, it was operating only a few months after the first 7-Eleven had come to town. These early locations were small but packed with a variety of products they often served as a “neighborhood market” in a world where convenience store wasn’t yet …

Continue reading